Quick Bites

Quick Bites are informative programs held over Interactive Video Conferencing on Thursdays from 12 noon – 1 p.m. Quick Bites are free to the public and cover a wide variety of topics. The best specialists and experts in Mississippi prepare a one-hour program on various topics such as gardening, horticulture, insect management, health, and cooking. Check back regularly for an updated calendar on upcoming topics and contact your local county Extension office to sign up to watch the programs.

For County Offices: To sign up for these programs, you can use the Online County Sign-Up Form or by emailing us at distanceed@ext.msstate.edu.

Interested individuals must contact their county office in order to participate in any interactive video program.

To view videos from past programs, click here.

Upcoming Quick Bites

Date: 06/29/2017 - 12:00pm
Description:

Fall armyworms are serious but sporadic pests of Bermuda grass hayfields throughout Mississippi. Learn how to scout for and control these and other insect pests of hayfields and pastures.

Date: 07/06/2017 - 12:00pm
Description:

Floral is an art form itself but taking florals and translating them to mimic or interpret a particular piece of art can challenge and push the creativity of a designer. Spend an hour with flowers and art!

Date: 07/13/2017 - 12:00pm
Description:

Even though we have had abundant rain so far this year, we know that the hot dry times are coming… Join us to learn more about drought tolerant plants that will grow in our Mississippi summers.

Date: 07/27/2017 - 12:00pm
Description:

Each year, commercial producers as well as home gardeners in Mississippi are affected by plant diseases that attack their crops, gardens, and trees. These plant diseases can significantly affect the outcome of a harvest. Dr. Rebecca Melanson, MSU Extension plant pathologist, will discuss disease development, the diagnostic process, and disease management in vegetables, fruits, and nuts. The presented information will help prepare home gardeners for tackling disease problems in their own backyard.